Title: Transition

Author: Jo Huey

 

 

Blurb:

An autobiography of Jo’s life from the trauma and unpredictability of living in an alcoholic home, through self-development transformation to the more content, happy and successful business woman she is today.

Jo shares her many insights into alcoholism and the effects on the family. An honest and brutal account of Jo’s experience with her father’s addiction to alcohol, she shares the highs and lows of life with an absent father and busy mother.

After life hit an all-time low in adulthood she decided to turn her life around and start a journey of self-discovery. Jo transformed herself through therapy, self-help books, groups, events and more which she shares in the book.

If you have experienced the challenges of living with someone’s drinking, then you’ll relate to Jo’s experience and feel the connection with her story.

If you are interested in an inspirational and motivational story, then you won’t be disappointed. Within the book, Jo shares several techniques you’ll be able to learn and use in your life if you really want the change you seek.

Jo Huey is an inspirational & motivational speaker, coach and author.

Jo gets up every morning wanting to help those with experiences like hers, those affected by someone’s drinking. She connects the dots to form a new picture using practical tools & techniques with the aim that they would genuinely feel better about themselves and live a calmer and chaos free life.

 

Buying links:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Transition-womans-journey-trauma-triumph-ebook/dp/B0727X8HWM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1501501296&sr=8-1&keywords=jo+huey

Author Interview:

Do you read your reviews? Do you respond to them if they are particularly good or bad? How do you deal with the bad?

Yes I read all my reviews, I feel very grateful to readers for taking the time to do it. It’s easy to read a book and then not give feedback. Whether it’s positive or negative I find it constructive to hear it from a different point of view.

I’m as objective as I can be if I read something less positive. If I don’t agree or think it’s inaccurate or mis-understood I work to explain my point but sometimes you have to agree to disagree. I respect that it’s someone’s opinion which they are entitled to. As long as it’s fair and constructive I have no problems at all with it.

What is your least favourite part of the writing/publishing process?

At times the writing process for me was hard because I had no idea how to structure the book. Thankfully I had the support of a great friend but that wasn’t until after I’d spent money on an editor and took a lot of the story out. I had to later add a lot of the details back in which was frustrating. I also found the process of waiting quite challenging, you just want to get it done and I found that I had to wait for other people to have the time to review it, I then had to edit it and do more editing which is time consuming.

Finally, once the book had been through a number of edits and changes it was ready. Then the publishing process was another steep learning curve. I managed to get it uploaded but then I had to get it converted for Kindle which was a challenge as the software wasn’t working. It was such a relief once it was fixed and I was able to offer it to people via Kindle.

The next part was also tricky which was promoting the book and making sure people know about it. There is so much to learn and you are doing it as you go with little or no help but it’s an achievement once you get there.

What are your favourite and least favourite types of scenes to write?

My least favourite part of the book was the sections about my past, because it did bring up all the unpleasant things that I’d experienced and I’m in a much more positive place now so I tend to want to focus on the positive.  I found the best aspects of the book were the insights, tools and techniques I’ve learnt that I could share with others that have experienced similar things to me. Having that insight is something so valuable and whilst I believe everyone has to learn their own way and make their own mistakes, if you hear from someone like you there is an amount of gravitas to it.

If you could have one superpower, what would it be and why?

If I could have a superpower it would be the power of insight. That’s not about seeing the future but being able to see a situation clearly and objectively with knowledge.

What’s the biggest insight/learning you’ve had throughout your journey?

That is a big question with so many answers. I think I’d have to give a few. Having openness and flexibility helps with self-development and change.

Nothing is forever, you can change your mind.

It’s OK to feel what you do, every emotion is normal

You don’t have to justify yourself, if you don’t fancy doing something… that is OK

Not everything your parents said was fact.

Who are some of your inspirations?

I love Louise Hay and Susan Jeffers, they were two key inspirations in my self-development journey. Both overcame difficult situations in their lives and went on to help others, I liked the way they translated their learning for the benefit of others. I really enjoyed their methods and how much it helped me when I most needed it.

Richard Bandler is an amazing person and co-created Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP). I find him exceptionally clever and inspirational. He brings simplicity and humour to his work and focuses on the positive which is very much what I do.

About the author:

Jo is an inspirational speaker, coach and author. She is also an adult child of an alcoholic and shares her personal story of living with an alcoholic father for 16 years and how that has impacted her adult life.

Jo is brutally honest about her experience, explaining how she coped as a child in an alcoholic home and the self-development journey she took in her twenties to overcome the trauma.

If you’ve experienced the impact of living with a heavy drinker, someone’s addiction or mental health problem you’ll relate to Jo’s story. For those of you that haven’t experienced what an alcoholic home brings it will give you an insight into the damage it causes to the family.

Jo shares her story for two reasons, the first is to connect with those that have been affected so they know they aren’t alone and the second to educate and inform others about this very hidden